Traditional Japanese Home Design

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Traditional Japanese Home Design

Posted by Brodeur Amaud on Wednesday, 6 November, 2019 11:58:47

A new home built in traditional Japanese style Osumi Yuso Architects This small house sits on a forested site at the base of Mount Daisen in western Japan. While designed for modern living, the dwelling incorporates features from old-time Japanese houses. It was designed… Continue reading →

Japanese carpenters developed advanced joinery techniques and occasionally constructed large buildings without using any nails. Complex wooden joints tied with rope can be seen in the frames of old Japanese houses. Traditional frames, known as wagoya, have a post-and-lintel design.

This small house sits on a forested site at the base of Mount Daisen in western Japan. While designed for modern living, the dwelling incorporates features from old-time Japanese houses. It was designed by Osumi Yuso Architects Office, known for its expertise in traditional Japanese architecture.

The Japan Housing Corporation (JHC), now known as the Urban Renaissance Agency (UR), was founded in 1955. During the 1950s, 60s, and 70s, the JHC built many danchi in suburban areas to offset the housing demand of the then-increasing Japanese population. Interior design Traditional homes

Japanese homes tend to be small and situated close to one another, whether in urban or rural settings. Yet key features of traditional Japanese residential design ensure privacy, natural light, protection from the elements and contact with the outdoors — no matter the size of the house or its location.

Originally a luxury that only the wealthy could afford, tatami gradually became more common and can now be found in virtually all traditional Japanese homes. Tatami mats have been so integral to Japanese homes, that the size of rooms in Japan is commonly measured by the number of mats that would fit it, e.g. an 8-mat room.